Partition madness

The state of my hard drives is getting out of hand.

There’s not really anything wrong with them, as such – it’s just that my distro-hopping habit has become a create-new-partition-and-install-new-distro habit.

Yes, I know I could satisfy my addiction using virtual machines (I do that as well using VirtualBox or VMWare), but I quite enjoy the whole partitioning and installing process, as well as the subsequent challenges sometimes involved in getting the new distro up-and-running. That’s right; I said I enjoy it, believe it or not. The people on Linux QuestionsUbuntu Forums and each of the distros’ individual communities have been a huge help in my many hours of need.

My laptop currently has four distros installed alongside Windows 7; Linux Mint, Ubuntu Studio, Manjaro (for development) and CentOS minimal (server, for tinkering with and learning), but that’s just the start of it. On our family desktop, all booting happily next to Windows 7, we now have;

  • Linux Mint
  • Ubuntu Studio
  • Manjaro
  • Kubuntu
  • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Unity)
  • ElementaryOS
  • Debian
  • CrunchBang
  • SolusOS
  • CentOS
  • Fedora
  • Fuduntu
  • OpenSUSE
  • Mageia
  • ROSA
  • PCLinuxOS
  • Sabayon
  • Chakra
  • Bridge
  • ArchBang
  • Slackware
  • BackTrack
  • Raring testing

OK… I recognise that I may have developed a slight obsession here…

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Ubuntu Studio documentation

I’ve been using Ubuntu Studio since I started experimenting with Linux again last November – it’s a great, multimedia-focused distribution based on Xubuntu, and it comes with all sorts of audio, video and graphics applications pre-installed. It also has a low-latency kernel, which (in theory) means that any real-time audio or video processing should proceed without getting interrupted by routine software updates or suchlike.

However, I hate to admit this, but I still don’t find it anywhere near as easy to lay down a quick backing track or indulge in some ad-hoc sound design as it is in Windows 7 or OSX. Part of this is bound to be familiarity – I had quite a bit of experience using both Windows and OSX for audio stuff – but the main issue is that the open-source pro-audio applications available and the linux audio stack just doesn’t seem quite as well-developed. Recording multi-track audio seems more than adequately covered by Ardour, but the electronic music industry has now pretty well embraced VST/AU plug-ins and virtual instruments, and it’s not easy (maybe impossible) to replicate the kind of plug-and-play workflow of applications like Ableton Live, Cubase or Logic Pro using the open source options currently available (yep, including the all-powerful Ardour).

Luckily, one of Ubuntu Studio’s real strengths is the documentation available, including the Ubuntu Studio Wiki, so if there’s a way to achieve a particular task, you can usually find out how in the docs. Another of the things I love about open source software is the opportunity to contribute, and I approached the Ubuntu Studio team last month about helping out – they told me that they could do with some help reviewing and updating the documentation. We agreed that the perfect place for me to start was with the Pro Audio Intro and the Jack Quick Start. I’m working my way through both of these (when I get chance alongside work stuff), but I’m having great fun learning about Ubuntu Studio and audio on linux in general.

UPDATE 27/06/2013: Unfortunately, since I learned that my current contract work contract will be ending soon, my focus has been (and will be for the foreseeable future) on ‘up-skilling’ in technology that’s more relevant to work, so Ubuntu Studio has had to take a back seat for the time-being…

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Be cool

MatchFlameI’ve just been reading a great blog post on Linux Advocates by Ken Starks called ‘time to put on our Big Boy pants‘, and it really struck a chord with me.

The only reason I got anywhere using the various operating systems and applications I’ve experimented with over the years is because I’ve clicked away at them like a big kid until I broke them (if I could), then had to work out how to fix what I broke, and learned a whole lot about how they worked in the process.

Now that we’re seeing the Raspberry Pi in schools and old PCs given a new lease of life with Linux, before being given to children who can’t afford a brand new one, there are ever greater numbers of kids out there doing the same thing – clicking, breaking, fixing, learning.

For this reason, it’s all the more important for those of us who populate the Linux and open-source communities to set a better example. Quite frankly some of the behaviour we all see now is worse than childish.

The other tangent of the article related to the usability and naming of apps, and sometimes it does feel a little like these are specifically designed to be off-putting or intimidating. This is self-defeating. As more talented young coders start to find their feet, those deliberately obstructive, “you’re not worthy” types of packages will be superseded by better and more user-friendly options that those young programmers will create themselves… and ultimately forgotten in the mists of history.

I get that some people feel that running Linux makes them the underdog, and that they love this. However, when the platform you use and the communities that surround it start gaining popularity, surely that should be celebrated – it shows that you were right all along in your choice.

If your reaction is to belittle and shame some unfortunate kid who doesn’t know the basics, and maybe doesn’t yet have the language skills needed to express themselves to your satisfaction… that’s not going to stop the influx of new people to your community, it just makes you look a little pathetic.

Surely a guiding hand is going to benefit us all much more than a slap in the face? It will benefit the poor kid (or average joe/joanna, or silver surfer) trying to find their way, it will benefit the community as a whole, and who knows, it might even benefit the person who thinks twice before spouting bile.

If we encourage a new generation of Linux-based hackers, coders and admins, if a greater proportion of the general population know how to manage their operating system and create elegant applications, surely that benefits all of us? Don’t worry, there will still be plenty of work to go around. We’re on the cusp of a new era in computing, all the signs are pointing to that. Let’s open the doors and really see what we can build together.

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#2 – learn to code

Original Image Attribution: Tim Lucas, toolmantim.com

Original Image Attribution: Tim Lucas, toolmantim.com

Well, that’s one of my New Year’s Resolutions anyway, to learn programming.

So, this is how I’m planning to go about it.

First, I’ve started Mozilla’s School of Webcraft at the ‘Peer To Peer University’ (P2PU). I’ve got some basic experience with HTML, but it looks like things move on fairly quickly to CSS and there seem to be modules on PHP and Python too. I like the way this site is set up. When you’re starting out on your learning journey, there are peers and mentors to help you through. It’s free to join and participate. Once you get competent at a subject, you can put yourself forwards as a mentor, and give something back to the community that helped you. I’ve yet to really see how that works in reality, but I like the idea.

Next, I think I’ll work through some of the courses at Codecademy, which is also free to use, by the looks of it. They have courses in jQuery, Javascript, Python and Ruby.

Then, it’s off to Learn Python The Hard Way by Zed A. Shaw, which is available to buy as a book, with the material on the website kindly made available for free. This course uses a technique that I’ve tried in the past, and I know works with me. You’re given clear instructions to carry out, which you do step-by-step, and repeat until they sink in – after that, what you’ve just done, and its significance, is explained. Zed has also written courses on Ruby, C, SQL, Regex and the Command Line Interface, most of which I’d like to work through at some point.

Finally, I’ve also bought a book: Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner by Mike Dawson (Amazon UK link). I haven’t properly looked through this yet, but it came recommended.

If you have any advice on which programming languages are good to learn, or of great resources to do so, please feel free to leave a comment below – I’m interested to hear your opinion.

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