Be cool

MatchFlameI’ve just been reading a great blog post on Linux Advocates by Ken Starks called ‘time to put on our Big Boy pants‘, and it really struck a chord with me.

The only reason I got anywhere using the various operating systems and applications I’ve experimented with over the years is because I’ve clicked away at them like a big kid until I broke them (if I could), then had to work out how to fix what I broke, and learned a whole lot about how they worked in the process.

Now that we’re seeing the Raspberry Pi in schools and old PCs given a new lease of life with Linux, before being given to children who can’t afford a brand new one, there are ever greater numbers of kids out there doing the same thing – clicking, breaking, fixing, learning.

For this reason, it’s all the more important for those of us who populate the Linux and open-source communities to set a better example. Quite frankly some of the behaviour we all see now is worse than childish.

The other tangent of the article related to the usability and naming of apps, and sometimes it does feel a little like these are specifically designed to be off-putting or intimidating. This is self-defeating. As more talented young coders start to find their feet, those deliberately obstructive, “you’re not worthy” types of packages will be superseded by better and more user-friendly options that those young programmers will create themselves… and ultimately forgotten in the mists of history.

I get that some people feel that running Linux makes them the underdog, and that they love this. However, when the platform you use and the communities that surround it start gaining popularity, surely that should be celebrated – it shows that you were right all along in your choice.

If your reaction is to belittle and shame some unfortunate kid who doesn’t know the basics, and maybe doesn’t yet have the language skills needed to express themselves to your satisfaction… that’s not going to stop the influx of new people to your community, it just makes you look a little pathetic.

Surely a guiding hand is going to benefit us all much more than a slap in the face? It will benefit the poor kid (or average joe/joanna, or silver surfer) trying to find their way, it will benefit the community as a whole, and who knows, it might even benefit the person who thinks twice before spouting bile.

If we encourage a new generation of Linux-based hackers, coders and admins, if a greater proportion of the general population know how to manage their operating system and create elegant applications, surely that benefits all of us? Don’t worry, there will still be plenty of work to go around. We’re on the cusp of a new era in computing, all the signs are pointing to that. Let’s open the doors and really see what we can build together.

If you like this, please feel free to click one of these fancy sharing buttons: